This is Happening!

Life

Scripps Graduation

Holy moly! I can’t believe graduation weekend is finally here! There is a whole list of adjectives that I am feeling in equal measure right now so I don’t even know how to describe it. I think the most accurate thing I can say is that I have a lot of feelings about it. Good feelings, bad feelings, scared feelings… All the feelings!

I’m excited, nervous, terrified, ecstatic, relieved, and, most notably, I am unbelievably grateful. Scripps College has been so good to me and has taught me so much about the world and about myself. It has both nurtured me and challenged me, and really has become my home. So while I am ready to move on and embrace the next adventure, I can’t help but look back on the past four years and feel a little sad to leave. All. The. Feelings.

Happy Scrippsies

Graduation with the FamilyNow it’s time to celebrate! (Before the panic sets in…)

Phi Beta Kappa

Life

So I have officially been inducted into what is probably the least secret “secret society” to exist in the United States. Although in their defense, I had never heard of it until I got my invitation… So maybe they’re doing a better job than I thought? My mom was very excited though, so I think it might be a big deal.

Anyway, this is the first of the official graduation ceremonies so it marks the beginning of the end. By the 17th I will officially be a college graduate!

Phi Beta Kappa at Scripps

Artist Obession: Tanaka Atsuko

Artist Obsession

I am so obsessed with the Gutai Collective. They were such originals and complete badasses who really put the Japanese avant guard on the map. So, I am pretty freaking excited that my last ever college assignment was a research paper for my Arts of Japan class, titled “Breaking the Rules and Bridging the Gap: Violence and Play in the Gutai Art of Postwar Japan.” 

In particular I am really excited about the work of Tanaka Atsukoand had fun analyzing her Electric Dress from 1956 for my paper:

“It is by far Tanaka’s most recognized work and shows both an interest in new technology and a reference to the past fashions of Japanese women. The Electric Dress is a costume made entirely from light bulbs, electric cables, and enamel paint. Tanaka painted oblong bulbs in bright enamel colors to create a Technicolor spectacle. The artist wore her dress around the gallery and interacted with the piece in a playful and physical way. . Visually this piece is incredibly playful and embodies the Gutai principles of originality and innovation. It is frivolous and absurdist and would never have been permitted during the severity of World War II and occupied Japan.

This celebration of technology and of electricity looks eagerly to the future. However, there is a violence and danger to her work as well. As one can imagine, being incased in a cocoon of bright florescent blubs would have been extremely hot and rather dangerous. ‘It was at once a flashy costume that seduced the eye and the imagination, and an unsafe instrument that threatened to electrocute the wearer, tear down the boundaries of painting, and make uncanny reference to the effects of nuclear war.’ The political climate of Japan postwar Japan was ever present in the work of Gutai artists as they constantly grappled with the shock of the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in July of 1945. This bright and cheerful outfit was also a source of fear and anxiety for the artist. The vast and inspiring potential of new technology could only exist with the looming fear of nuclear power and destruction. Tanaka’s Electric Dress exists in a space between joy and terror and draws on both the future and the past. Like other works of the Gutai collective, it looks to the global art conversation while remaining intimately tied to Japan’s historic and cultural past.”

Gutai Electric Dress

What a badass!