Artist Obsession: Nicole Crock

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists, Photography

I’m such a sucker for vintage photos. The mystery and nostalgia totally gets to me. I do, however, think it’s quite difficult to use vintage photos in contemporary art without having the whole piece look dated and frumpy. Nicole Crock’s photo and installation series,Tessellate, updates vintage looks into something completely modern and really captivating. It is very cool.

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Plus, she describes the whole process and inspiration really eloquently on her site.

Tessellate is an ongoing project that uses vintage photographs of people and their homes found in thrift stores and antique malls. These left-behind images are disconnected from their origins but retain the vague ache of unknowable history as they are transformed into abstract, nostalgic tessellations. With each installment of the project the images and sculptures morph and multiply.

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tessellate 2I love the 3D installation aspect, but the flat images have a really strong dimensionality as well. They are crisp and clean, without sacrificing depth or meaning. That’s a difficult balance to strike so needless to say, I am impressed. And some of them are available on Etsy! Score! I am moving across the country next month and will be settling into a new apartment (and life) so the themes here of estrangement and home are resonating especially well with me at the moment.

I’ve moved many times in my life, making the idea of home and community very significant to me. Ignited by this interest in location and movement, I tell the stories of place and transformation using found and constructed materials. I examine the elements of home through varied mediums including sculpture, installation, and performance.

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Minimalist Poetry as Installation

Artist Obsession

Okay, this is too cool not to share. Mikko Kuorinki created this installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Finland called “Wall Piece with 200 Letters,” and I love it. The concept, the execution, everything. It’s simply beautiful.

As the title implies, Kuorinki created a poem or phrase from a finite set of letters which changed every week for a year. Part performance and part installation, the exhibit used text as both and aesthetic element and as a way to disrupt conventions of human behavior and communication.

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Here are a couple favorites but the whole exhibition is documented on Kuorinki’s website.

Artist Obsession: Jessica Stoller

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists

Have you ever heard of the “feminine grotesque?” Neither had I. But the descriptor seems to fit Jessica Stoller’s ceramic works like a glove. These delicate and intricate porcelain sculptures are undoubtably girlish creations but with a darker edge. It’s totally badass.

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I think Hyperallergic described her installation perfectly:

“At first glance, the grinning skull may not so much alarm you because the whole ensemble appears perfectly frilly, pastel, and proper. It takes a minute to register that a number of the desserts appear to be made from breasts, others topped with hands whose fingernails look like they belong to some Cruella de Vil–like personification of death. At one end of the table, what looks like a pastry features the visage of a blonde woman, her lips an icy purplish pink and a fly grazing on her left cheek. Suddenly the chocolate dripping from the strawberries at the other end begins to look quite sinister.”

So yeah. Creepy and weird and also incredible. Check her out.