Jeppe Hein: Please Touch the Art (Public Art Fund Lecture)

Adventures, Art World News

I went to an awesome talk last night where public artist and interactive sculptor, Jeppe Hein shared his charming thoughts and work. Hein was absolutely inspiring and really fun to listen to. The lecture included interactive elements with balloons, raisons, impromptu musical performances, and ricocheting ping pong balls to keep everyone on their toes and “in the here and now.” Most of Hein’s recent work deals with this concept of living in the present and embracing spontaneity. It’s an important reminder. Plus, it was cool to see an artist whose work so accurately reflects his personality and self. Loved it!

Jeppe Hein Ping Pong Ball!

I even kept a ping pong ball 😀

No Problem Cologne/New York 1984-1989

Adventures

I went to an awesome launch event last night for David Zwirner Books and their publication “No Problem: Cologne.” It’s a gorgeous book full of all my favorite eighties urban artists. Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, Christopher Wool, Jeff Koons, Jenny Holzer, etc. It’s an impressive list. Plus, the book features a couple of Richard Prince pieces that I had never seen before so that was a fun bonus. It’s funny to think that after all my thesis research, there is still more work to discover.

No Problem Cologne

One of the essayists, Bob Nickas was there for a Q and A and had some interesting thoughts about that particular art moment and it’s socio-historical context.

The book is available on Amazon and is currently featured on my coffee table.

Artist Obsession: Nicole Crock

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists, Photography

I’m such a sucker for vintage photos. The mystery and nostalgia totally gets to me. I do, however, think it’s quite difficult to use vintage photos in contemporary art without having the whole piece look dated and frumpy. Nicole Crock’s photo and installation series,Tessellate, updates vintage looks into something completely modern and really captivating. It is very cool.

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Plus, she describes the whole process and inspiration really eloquently on her site.

Tessellate is an ongoing project that uses vintage photographs of people and their homes found in thrift stores and antique malls. These left-behind images are disconnected from their origins but retain the vague ache of unknowable history as they are transformed into abstract, nostalgic tessellations. With each installment of the project the images and sculptures morph and multiply.

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tessellate 2I love the 3D installation aspect, but the flat images have a really strong dimensionality as well. They are crisp and clean, without sacrificing depth or meaning. That’s a difficult balance to strike so needless to say, I am impressed. And some of them are available on Etsy! Score! I am moving across the country next month and will be settling into a new apartment (and life) so the themes here of estrangement and home are resonating especially well with me at the moment.

I’ve moved many times in my life, making the idea of home and community very significant to me. Ignited by this interest in location and movement, I tell the stories of place and transformation using found and constructed materials. I examine the elements of home through varied mediums including sculpture, installation, and performance.

State-fair_Nicole-Crock

 

Minimalist Poetry as Installation

Artist Obsession

Okay, this is too cool not to share. Mikko Kuorinki created this installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Finland called “Wall Piece with 200 Letters,” and I love it. The concept, the execution, everything. It’s simply beautiful.

As the title implies, Kuorinki created a poem or phrase from a finite set of letters which changed every week for a year. Part performance and part installation, the exhibit used text as both and aesthetic element and as a way to disrupt conventions of human behavior and communication.

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Here are a couple favorites but the whole exhibition is documented on Kuorinki’s website.

Artist Obsession: Jessica Stoller

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists

Have you ever heard of the “feminine grotesque?” Neither had I. But the descriptor seems to fit Jessica Stoller’s ceramic works like a glove. These delicate and intricate porcelain sculptures are undoubtably girlish creations but with a darker edge. It’s totally badass.

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I think Hyperallergic described her installation perfectly:

“At first glance, the grinning skull may not so much alarm you because the whole ensemble appears perfectly frilly, pastel, and proper. It takes a minute to register that a number of the desserts appear to be made from breasts, others topped with hands whose fingernails look like they belong to some Cruella de Vil–like personification of death. At one end of the table, what looks like a pastry features the visage of a blonde woman, her lips an icy purplish pink and a fly grazing on her left cheek. Suddenly the chocolate dripping from the strawberries at the other end begins to look quite sinister.”

So yeah. Creepy and weird and also incredible. Check her out.

Summer Snapshots

Life, Photography

I am back in Seattle and having a lovely summer of ice cream, sunshine, and good people. Lot’s of beach relaxation too! Unfortunately the internet speed at my parents house is stuck in the early nineties. I swear to god, it’s slower than dial-up. However, it’s been kind of a nice reminder to unplug and go outside…

So this is a little dump of snapshots I’ve taken in the past week or so. (All of which can also be found on my Instagram…so I guess this is a little bit redundant.) But I’ve been paying special attention lately to my iphone photography skills and trying to see the world in new and creative ways. Haha I feel obnoxious even saying that but it’s true. Probably, I’m just bored.

Red Mill Burgers

Bridesmaid Duty

Pike Place Flowers

Molly Moon's Ice Cream

Hood Canal

Soft Serve!

Millennials in Museums

Art World News

I found this on Tumblr recently and thought it was kind of fabulous. You’ve gotta love the irreverence millennials have for ancient art and museums. It’s ridiculous.

Cell Phone Art

There is, however, a lot of serious and merited debate currently happening in the museum world over this very topic. Should we embrace this type of behavior or condemn it. A lot of museums are starting to do away with or readjust their iphone policies.

Artist Obession: Tanaka Atsuko

Artist Obsession

I am so obsessed with the Gutai Collective. They were such originals and complete badasses who really put the Japanese avant guard on the map. So, I am pretty freaking excited that my last ever college assignment was a research paper for my Arts of Japan class, titled “Breaking the Rules and Bridging the Gap: Violence and Play in the Gutai Art of Postwar Japan.” 

In particular I am really excited about the work of Tanaka Atsukoand had fun analyzing her Electric Dress from 1956 for my paper:

“It is by far Tanaka’s most recognized work and shows both an interest in new technology and a reference to the past fashions of Japanese women. The Electric Dress is a costume made entirely from light bulbs, electric cables, and enamel paint. Tanaka painted oblong bulbs in bright enamel colors to create a Technicolor spectacle. The artist wore her dress around the gallery and interacted with the piece in a playful and physical way. . Visually this piece is incredibly playful and embodies the Gutai principles of originality and innovation. It is frivolous and absurdist and would never have been permitted during the severity of World War II and occupied Japan.

This celebration of technology and of electricity looks eagerly to the future. However, there is a violence and danger to her work as well. As one can imagine, being incased in a cocoon of bright florescent blubs would have been extremely hot and rather dangerous. ‘It was at once a flashy costume that seduced the eye and the imagination, and an unsafe instrument that threatened to electrocute the wearer, tear down the boundaries of painting, and make uncanny reference to the effects of nuclear war.’ The political climate of Japan postwar Japan was ever present in the work of Gutai artists as they constantly grappled with the shock of the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in July of 1945. This bright and cheerful outfit was also a source of fear and anxiety for the artist. The vast and inspiring potential of new technology could only exist with the looming fear of nuclear power and destruction. Tanaka’s Electric Dress exists in a space between joy and terror and draws on both the future and the past. Like other works of the Gutai collective, it looks to the global art conversation while remaining intimately tied to Japan’s historic and cultural past.”

Gutai Electric Dress

What a badass!

Chasing Change

Life

Ezra Pound

“The artist is always beginning. Any work of art which is not a beginning, an invention, a discovery is of little worth.”  -Ezra Pound

Always be moving forward. Always be pushing yourself to do something new. Always be innovating. Always be striving. Always be starting over. Don’t get complacent. Don’t get to comfortable. New beginnings are scary but oh-so-necessary.

Mondays are hard and senior year is scary, but I am growing more lately than I ever have because I’m doing things that scare me. This is a good reminder not to fear change. We should embrace it and chase after it, because out of change comes progress. And progress is awesome.

Juarez Women

Art World News, Painting

Initially I was a little skeptical of an Irish man making art about murdered Mexican women. However, his work and his statements are a thoughtful and respectful tribute and I am glad this important crisis is getting the attention it deserves. The portraits themselves are beautiful, powerful and tragic. It’s important work by Brian McGuire and definitely deserves a look.

“The killing campaign in Mexico has taken the lives of more than 1,400 young women since 1994, mainly factory girls working in maquiladoras,sweatshops of sorts, who were abducted around town. Maguire spent time with the victim’s mothers, discussing their daughter’s lives and premature deaths, before beginning to paint two portraits of each victim: one representing the young girl during her life and another, after death. Though his works are intuitively somber in subject matter and style, they convey a subtle hopefulness in the boldness of strokes and in the unexpected pops of color.”

 

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The title of this seres is The Absence of Justice Demands This Act and it’s showing at Fergus McCaffrey in New York through the end of the month. Check out this article and the gallery website, if you’d like.