Artist Obsession Georgiana Paraschiv

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists

Georgiana Paraschiv’s patterns and prints are on a whole new level regarding bold color and geometric abstraction. Clearly she has an exceptional eye for proportions and division of space. Plus, her understanding of color theory and mixed texture is seriously impressive. From pomegranates to watercolors to crazy angular designs, Paraschiv’s aesthetic comes through loud and clear in every single piece. I am absolutely obsessed.

by Georgiana Paraschiv

Escapism by Georgiana Paraschiv

Blueberry pattern by Georgiana Paraschiv

Sunrise by Georgiana Paraschiv

Georgiana Paraschiv

Broken flower by Georgiana Paraschiv-1

Busy Shapes by Georgiana Paraschiv

Pomegranate by Georgiana Paraschiv

It was so hard to chose which images to feature here because she has SO MANY gorgeous and interesting images online. Seriously, this woman must be busy. She’s got profiles on Behance and Society6; plus her portfolio website is chalk full of her prints and designs so if you’re into weird fruit and bright pops of yellow and pink, I would recommend looking her up.

Artist Obsession: Hilary Harnischfeger

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists, Mixed Media, Painting

I am a sucker for interesting textures and abstract paintings in soft pastel palettes. It’s a seriously brilliant combination and one I could stare at endlessly. That’s how I feel about Hilary Harnischfeger’s work. I just want to look at it forever.

When I first came stumbled across her sculptural wall-mounted masterpieces, I was completely floored. She isn’t afraid to really explore the tactility of different mediums and combine them in unexpected ways. If you look at her artist profile on the Saatchi Gallery website, Harnischfeger has a laundry list of materials that she uses to create these multidimensional sculpture/painting hybrids. Paper, ink, mica, fluorite, crushed glass, plaster, pyrite… anything and everything. The effect is pretty mesmerizing.

hilary harnischfeger 1

hilary harnischfeger 2

hilary harnischfeger 3

Something about them reminds me of Dr. Seuss… so so good.

Artist Obsession: Ellen Gallagher

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists, Mixed Media

I love that feeling of being completely stopped in my tracks by a work of art, and encountering something with the power to disrupt my life for a minute; to focus my consciousness in a new way. It happens so rarely, but thats what makes it so special. Art is nifty. 

So I saw some of Ellen Gallagher’s art on display at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College this past fall. The exhibit featured a number of contemporary women artists and their work in printmaking. There was an entire wall of Gallagher’s works, all framed in a grid, and it had a pretty profound impact on me. I came back to the exhibit several times just to stare at her prints and am totally kicking myself for not taking any pictures. This image from the MOMA’s website is pretty similar though, so you get the idea.

Anyway,these are really cool. They are bright and color blocked with pinks and yellows on newsprint. She uses a lot of different mediums at once and layers them in a really interesting way. Plus, the political message inherent in her work is really powerful. She uses vintage advertisements for beauty products geared towards black men and women, and subverts them with multimedia collage. I’m so glad I remembered this artist’s name, (not hard considering it’s the same as mine) and that I happened to find some of her work online. Ellen Gallagher’s prints embody all the things I love about art. They are aesthetically beautiful and really intellectually stimulating, without being overly complicated or pretentious. Plus I kind of love anything that appropriates vintage ads…

Ellen Gallagher

Ellen Gallagher

Ellen Gallagher

Ellen Gallagher

So incredible. That is all. Happy Holidays.

Cady Noland is a Bit of a Rebel

Art World News, Contemporary Women Artists

I just stumbled across an interesting article about Cady Noland in ArtNet which asks who is crazier: Noland or Richard Prince?

Since I am conducting my Senior thesis research on Richard Prince, anything with his name in the title immediately piques my interest. Prince is a notoriously strong personality and, if you ask me, kind of an asshole. Apparently Cady Noland is also incredibly intense and hard to work with. She rarely gives permission for her works to be shown and has gotten into legal issues with collectors over her refusal to remount pieces.

Once a work is sold, the artist really doesn’t have much control over when, where, and how it’s being shown. She no longer owns it. However, Noland’s work in particular is quite precarious and is entirely dependent on how it is assembled. It seems to be intended as something ephemeral which exists only in a single context. However, museums and private collectors are constantly trying to reshow the most famous works of her past. I understand how incredibly frustrating that might be for some artists. Your name will be attached to a work forever, even after you have no rights to control its display. Is it still Cady Noland’s art is she didn’t set it up or approve the positioning? Or is it just a bunch of empty beer cans? Where does the art happen?

The cynic in me must also question if this is just some part of her public persona, perpetuated to establish notoriety and mystery. Does it make the works more valuable? She seems entirely in conflict with the business side of the contemporary art world. Ironic for one of the top-selling female artists of her lifetime…

“It’s an interesting predicament, given that Noland is one of the top 10 most expensive female living artists, with her 1989 sculpture Oozewald holding the record for the highest price ever paid for an artwork by a female living artist at $6.6 million. In a way, her refusal to cooperate with the people who want to buy, sell, and display her work is the ultimate biting of the hand that feeds. Considering the current state of the art world, in which artists often complain of feeling like part of a meat market buffet, it’s a fascinating, if somewhat misguided, act of rebellion.”

I saw her work exhibited (without permission) at the Brant Foundation over winter break in Deliverance which also featured works from Prince, Christopher Wool, and Larry Clark. It is weird to look at an artist’s work while being acutely aware that they did not want it to be seen. It makes me kind of sad for her. I mean yes she seems really extreme and rather antisocial. But not having control over your own art would be supremely frustrating. Then again if she is making $6 million off a single piece, I can’t pity her too much…