No Problem Cologne/New York 1984-1989

Adventures

I went to an awesome launch event last night for David Zwirner Books and their publication “No Problem: Cologne.” It’s a gorgeous book full of all my favorite eighties urban artists. Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, Christopher Wool, Jeff Koons, Jenny Holzer, etc. It’s an impressive list. Plus, the book features a couple of Richard Prince pieces that I had never seen before so that was a fun bonus. It’s funny to think that after all my thesis research, there is still more work to discover.

No Problem Cologne

One of the essayists, Bob Nickas was there for a Q and A and had some interesting thoughts about that particular art moment and it’s socio-historical context.

The book is available on Amazon and is currently featured on my coffee table.

Reunion Weekend Invitations

Adventures

I am so excited for reunion weekend and I’m not even an alumna yet! Scripps College is a magical wonderful place and I love seeing all the past students rolling through and reminiscing. I work in fundraising and alumnae relations and often get to talk with Scripps women over the phone, but talking to them in person is so much better. It’s fun and festive and gets me totally jazzed to graduate. Plus, I have a couple of friends coming to visit that I haven’t seen since they graduated last spring. There are a couple of Reunion Weekend events which are open to the senior class (for networking and what not) and so the alumnae relations office had me whip up an invite for the Senior class. It gave me a nice chance to flex my photoshop muscles. So here it is!

Reunion Weekend Events Scripps CollegeScripps College Reunion Weekend Invitations

Artist Obsession: Lisa Hedge

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists, Photography

Who said commercial product photography can’t be whimsical and beautiful and fabulous? And all while appearing to be completely effortless. Artist and Art Director Lisa Hedge proves that it can be done. She has an immense body of work and proves that sometimes having assignments with strict parameters can produce the best results. From wedding stationary, to event posters, to product shots, clothing campaigns, and everything in between, Lisa Hedge is a creative genius. (And probably a total perfectionist.)

Who knew I could be so attracted to clear-framed reading glasses? These Warby Parker product photos look like so much fun.

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Plus I kind of want to get married just so I can send out these “Save the Dates.” LisaHedge_Card_04_1000Or these…LisaHedge_Green_02_1000

 

There are so many cool things on her website. Seriously. I am barely scratching the surface with these. Tons of variety but still a really coherent aesthetic. I’m impressed.

 

 

Artist Obsession Georgiana Paraschiv

Artist Obsession, Contemporary Women Artists

Georgiana Paraschiv’s patterns and prints are on a whole new level regarding bold color and geometric abstraction. Clearly she has an exceptional eye for proportions and division of space. Plus, her understanding of color theory and mixed texture is seriously impressive. From pomegranates to watercolors to crazy angular designs, Paraschiv’s aesthetic comes through loud and clear in every single piece. I am absolutely obsessed.

by Georgiana Paraschiv

Escapism by Georgiana Paraschiv

Blueberry pattern by Georgiana Paraschiv

Sunrise by Georgiana Paraschiv

Georgiana Paraschiv

Broken flower by Georgiana Paraschiv-1

Busy Shapes by Georgiana Paraschiv

Pomegranate by Georgiana Paraschiv

It was so hard to chose which images to feature here because she has SO MANY gorgeous and interesting images online. Seriously, this woman must be busy. She’s got profiles on Behance and Society6; plus her portfolio website is chalk full of her prints and designs so if you’re into weird fruit and bright pops of yellow and pink, I would recommend looking her up.

Los Angeles Adventures: Doug Loves Movies

Adventures, Life

My friends and I have dubbed this year as the “Year of Adventure.” It will be that last time all three of us are living in the same place and we are determined to make the most of it. The result of this declaration is that we have been going into the city more often and trying lots of new things: art shows, science museums, concerts, comedy festivals, networking events, bowling! You name it, we’ve done it. So last weekend we went to a live taping of the “Doug Loves Movies” podcast at the Nerdmelt showroom. My friend Martha is obsessed with Doug Benson (and Scott Aukerman who made a surprise appearance.) I was just along for the ride.

Meghan and Martha at Nerdmelt Meghan at Nerdmelt Nerdmelt Comics

The venue was awesome. A comic book store / comedy stage with really good vibes. As expected, the taping was super fun and I even got picked to participate! Anyone who listens to the show knows that audience members make “nametags” (movie posters altered with some sort of pun) and then the celebrity contestants pick someone to play for. It’s really fun for anyone who likes to goof around on Photoshop as much as I do. The night before, Martha and I popped open a bottle of wine in the computer lab and cranked out these kooky movie poster masterpieces. Don’t I make a great Angelina Jolie?

Doug Loves Movies Nametags

It was a blast! I think the podcast is on itunes, if anyone wants to hear them talk about my poster and do hilarious movie trivia. They even call my friend Alexandra a shithead. It’s incredible!

Japanese Design

Art World News, Life

Last night I was fortunate enough to listen to Patricia Graham speak about Japanese art and aesthetics. She is absolutely brilliant and it was really neat to hear her opinions on design and discussions of her new book. I have studied Japan a little in my Art History coursework, focusing almost entirely on the Gutai collective and Shiraga Kazao. So I was almost entirely ignorant of Graham’s particular interest, namely the universal Japanese aesthetic and how it permeates every aspect of craft and creation. Japanese art has a distinct look to it. But so does Japanese architecture, product design, furniture, fashion, and performance. It isn’t just sculpture or painting or calligraphy, it’s everything. That distinctly Japanese visual style.

All too often in Art History, we focus in on one particular artist, medium, or movement. We get so caught up in the tiny details and nuances of a particular work that we forget where it fits in the larger cultural framework. This lecture really helped me refocus my attention on the big picture.